Barbuda

Its been a tough two years for the sister Isle of Antigua. In 2017 it was devastated by Hurricane Irma and in the time since, Barbuda has worked hard to bring back some sense of normality. It has been however, an uphill battle. The last shelter, housing a few Barbudan’s remaining on Antigua, closed this last July 2019. The Island is still plagued by a poor water supply, lack of electricity and bank service and has no hospital. Plans to build an international airport were abandoned after initial land clearance and the demolition of historical ruins led to discovery of underground caves.

Visiting Barbuda is a must, they are waiting for you. In the past, lack of tourism was part of its undeveloped charm and a lure for those who appreciate the simpler things in life. Barbudans are fighting to get back that sense of natural charm but with the opportunity to improve this unique destination.

Popular anchorages are at Coco Point and Spanish Point. Anchor at Low Bay and you will need to get to the village across the lagoon. River Wharf is used by the ferry and fishing boats so there is often not any room for yachts. Burbuda is surrounded by some 200 historic wrecks, great for diving but take care when approaching.

Nature is Barbudas biggest asset. Wildlife is abundant here. It is visible ever you travel on the Island but none more so than the Frigate Bird Sanctuary in Codrington Lagoon. You must use a recommended guide to visit here, it is forbidden to use your own dinghy to visit the Sanctuary. Caves are plentiful with ancient drawings and evidence of amphipods, bats and iguanas. It is advisable to seek out a guide for some harder to reach caves.

If unspoilt beaches and pink sand is your thing, look no further. Try the Atlantic side for beachcombing and tumbling surf and the Caribbean side for turtles, sharks and pelicans fishing and the rock pools for paddling in and calm shallow water. A must is 11 mile Beach, the clue is in the name!

Fishing, a pastime of many a weekend warrior, is generally for food here, but you can arrange a trip with a local tour organiser. It is advisable to do this as a local initiative by the Blue Halo Trust has drawn up regulations and permitted fishing areas. Barbuda is trying hard to preserve its ecology.

For much more on Barbuda look at the site Barbudaful.net and plan your visit to this one of a kind Island.

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